Our Whiskey America range

It was the Scots and Irish who brought whisk(e)y to America. During the great wave of immigration in the second half of the 18th century, they found the best conditions to bring a piece of home to the country. However, since barley did not grow, they had to resort to rye and wheat. This resulted in whiskey made from rye, rye whiskey, which was also used to trade goods at the time. Read more

It was the Scots and Irish who brought whisk(e)y to America. During the great wave of immigration in the second half of the 18th century, they found the best conditions to bring a piece of home to the country. However, since barley did not grow, they had to resort to rye and wheat. This resulted in whiskey made from rye, rye whiskey, which was also used to trade goods at the time.

In 1794, George Washington imposed a tax on whiskey. The settlers did not accept this. There was a rebellion in Pennsylvania, which was put down by an army of 13,000 men. They then moved further west to the states of Kentucky and Tennessee, which are still the strongholds of American whiskey today.

Probably the best-known variant is the bourbon whiskey, which consists of at least 51 % and at most 80 % corn. It matures for about two years in burnt-out oak barrels. The best-known distilleries are Buffalo Trace and Jim Beam.

Characteristically similar to bourbon, Tennessee whiskey differs in the filtering process. It is filtered through a thick layer of sugar maple charcoal, which gives it its mild taste. It is produced by brands such as George Dickel or Jack Daniels.

Another well-known variety is rye whiskey, which is blended with at least 51% rye. The small amount of natural sugar gives it its strong taste. Typical American ryes are Knob Creek or Bulleit Rye.